William PIERCE – Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer

IN LOVING MEMORY OF WILLIAM PIERCE, WHO DIED MAY 1ST, 1905. ALSO OF MARY, HIS WIFE, DIED FEB 24TH, 1906.

William Pierce was born about 1823 in Hanmer, his father was Benjamin Pierce who was a blacksmith from Wrexham, his mother was Anne who was from Ruabon.

On 15 August 1850 William married Mary Ann Evans in St Bride, Toxteth, he was a Cabinet Maker, Mary Ann`s father was Robert Evans, deceased, who had been an innkeeper. The couple both had the same abode in 136 Islington Street.

It`s been found from census records that Mary Ann`s mother was Mary, in 1851 she is living in Mount Street with her son Edward Evans, but she had remarried, and her name is now Barrott. Who her husband was isn`t known as she was a widow.  

Up until 1857 William had been in partnership with Edwin Owen, but they decided to go separate ways.

DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the partnership hitherto subsiding between the undersigned, carrying on  the business or trade of Cabinet Makers and Upholsterers, under the firm of “PIERCE AND OWEN,” of Wrexham, in the county of Denbigh, was dissolved by mutual  consent, on the 1st day of January, 1857. All debts owing to, or by, the late firm, will be received and paid by William Pierce,  Bridge-Street, or Edwin Owen, Town Hill, until further notice.

Jan. 9, 1857
4th April 1857

Edwin Owen carried on his own business as a cabinet maker on Town Hill and became an agent for a cleaning and dyeing company from Liverpool.

William expanded his range of goods and in 1859 announced that he was now stocking carpets.

CARPETS, CARPETS, CARPETS!! OLD ESTABLISHED CABINET & UPHOLSTERY WAREHOUSE; BRIDGE STREET, WREXHAM. “WILLIAM PIERCE, BEGS most respectfully to inform the Public of Wrexham and the neighbourhood, that he has just added to his stock a large quantity of Kidderminster, Dutch, felt and other carpets, which he is prepared to sell at the lowest Trade Prices, having made his purchases previous to the present rise in Prices. W. P. has always in Stock, a large selection of the best Home-Made Cabinet Furniture, and every other article in the Trade.

January 1st, 1859

William was doing well and employing 4 workers in 1861 By now they had 3 children, James Hopley 9, Julia Ann 4 and Margaret who was 10 months old. His father Benjamin was with them, but he died the following year aged 68. Also in the house is Mary Barrot, a retired publican from Mold, in 1851 she was a widow and a grocer and provision dealer in Mount Street, and living with her son Edward Evans.   She was William`s mother in law. It`s not known when she remarried to Mr Barrot or even who he was.

In June 1867 a new club was opened in town, William supplied the furniture.

OPENING OF THE TOWN AND COUNTY CLUB. On Monday the Town and Country Club was opened to members by a general meeting and a conversation in the evening. The premises taken for the purpose and known as Hope-street House (late the residence of Mr T. C. Jones) are most convenient for the objects of the club, both from their central position and internal arrangements. The suite of rooms, now furnished and opened, consist of dining room, reading room, library, and smoking room. These rooms are furnished with good plain furniture of the best quality and most substantial character, supplied by Mr Wm. Pierce, of Bridge-street, and its selection reflects the highest praise on the good taste of the committee.

1867
1868

In 1869 it looks like William was rather annoyed when he lost the contact for his coffins, he thought it was a case of Hugh Davies using his influence to favour his son.  It is quite a long article, but the outcome was that nothing was done, and the letter was ordered to “lie on the table” This wasn`t a popular decision by many.

A COMPLAINT PROM THE LATE CONTRACTOR FOR COFFINS.  ORDERED TO LIE ON THE TABLE. The Clerk read the following letter from Mr Pierce, cabinetmaker: To THE CHAIRMAN AND GUARDIANS OF THE WREXHAM UNION. GENTLEMEN Having  contracted for and supplied the coffins for the Wrexham district of the Union for the last three years without a single complaint, I sent my tender in as usual the last contract day, but am informed that the tender of Llewelyn Davies of Erddig Road, has been accepted. Is he not a son of Mr Hugh Davies, Joiner and builder, of this town, the guardian for Abenbury Fechan? and was not his father on the contract committee? and did he not use his influence for his son? – he knowing the amount of any previous contract. Also, has Mr Llewelyn Davies a place of business of his own? or does he work for his lather as a journeyman? If the latter is the case his father will directly and indirectly receive benefit from the contract, which is contrary to the Act of Parliament and the orders of the Poor Law Board. I feel sorry to trouble you with these inquiries, but felt it my duty to do so, believing that some undue influence has been used against me. You will, therefore, extremely oblige me by throwing a little light on the subject.  I am, gentlemen, yours respectfully, WILLIAM PIERCE.

9th October 1869

The Chairman asked for the contracts, and on reading them it was seen that where Mr Pierce had 17s, Mr Llewelyn Davies had 16s 9d, and Mr Pierce had 13s, where Llewelyn Davies had 12s 9d. The vice-Chairman:  Threepence is a curious figure for them to differ. The Chairman; I think the only way will be to have Mr Pierce before the board to make the like complaint, and we will have Mr Davies as well; then we shall be able to get at the whole of it.  

William stayed in Bridge Street and by 1871 had more children, son James Hopley was now an accountant’s clerk and he had two more young sisters, Elizabeth 5 and Eleanor just 7 months old.

By 1891 his daughter Julia Annie was the principal of the school at 1 King Street, Margaret, Elizabeth and Eleanor were teachers there. William and Mary were also living there.

They moved to Percy Road with daughter Margaret and Elizabeth and Eleanor who were both school governesses.

William died 1 May 1905 in Percy Road, Mary died there the next year on 24 February 1906.

Their son James Hopley became a successful solicitor and died in 1926.

Researched by Annette Edwards. July 2019

Wrexham Cemetery 23/03/2018

Grave ref: Wrexham Cemetery J-02372